Monday, August 10, 2009

not on automatic IV

This week's lesson on A Familiar Path was about adjusting your ISO on your camera to allow for more light in indoor shots. Thank the Lord someone finally explained this! My house is under lots of trees and only one room has really great light. Taking pics indoors has always been a challenge for me.

I like to be able to compare the adjustments on my camera with the same subject, so I can see how the adjustments work. Here we are on automatic: the flash popped up because I was in a dark corner. The topiary is so brightly lit up, since it is closest to the camera, and as the light falls away, the other objects are in the shadow. Yuck.

Ok, so I put the camera on P and adjusted the ISO to 640. The result was a little blurry, but the light in the picture now is wonderful, and more of a reflection of how the room is in actuality. Let's try again, shall we?


This one is set on ISO 800, and I love how it turned out. The image is crisp and the details are there.

This lesson was very useful. So very useful. It will make taking pictures in my house much better, and when I have kids this should be an advantage. Yay!

5 comments:

Melissa Stover said...

oh yes, huge difference. i love that you compare them because it lets you know whether or not you want to keep using that setting or the flash. but i say you got it just right!

deb said...

I so appreciate that you post the differences as well, I can't believe I didn't get to this, with a daughter leaving for school, husband away, the usual:)
thanks

Frizzy said...

Very nice pictures and a huge difference for sure. I went and left a message on her blog. Looking forward to trying her tips out. Trying to figure out my ISO.

Beth said...

Wow, your right-the 800 is perfect! I love your comparisons with the still life. Great!

Jamie said...

I'm with you... I'm always trying to figure out tricks with my fun fancy camera. I always need someone to explain ISO and aperture and all those fancy words. Luckily, Drew's really good with all that. My only problem is that I forget what I did the next time I try to take a picture. "Was that the ISO or the aperture? Hmm..."